parenting

activities

events

family fun

Culinary Delights

Home » education

Security Guidelines for Schools

Submitted by on June 23, 2013 – 4:09 pmNo Comment

School Safety Guidelines from ESA

ESA Panel of Experts Creates New Resource for School Security Programs

The Electronic Security Association (ESA) recently completed the ESA Electronic Security Guidelines for Schools, a resource for school officials that are considering adding electronic security systems to a new or existing school security program. The Guidelines are now available for free public download on www.ESAweb.org.

The Guidelines provide an in-depth look at the various components that lead to an effective school security program. The Guidelines will give school officials an understanding of the steps necessary for creating a security solution including overall security planning, assessment of threats, procurement types, contractor selection, how systems affect schools, equipment types, and system use. The Guidelines also illustrate the importance of community involvement and communication between schools and local responders.

The Guidelines are the consensus of a voluntary panel of security industry experts that collectively have extensive and diverse experience in securing K-12 schools. The panel was led by David Koenig; an industry advisor, treasurer of ESA and partner of Capital Fire and Security in Madison, Wis.

“These days, schools are under more pressure to provide a safe environment for students, and technology is an important part of that,” Koenig said. “We are all proud to be able to gather our knowledge and offer schools a practical tool they can use.”

With help from professional organizations for educators and responders, ESA is reaching out to school officials across the nation with hopes of alleviating the concerns that come with tackling a major security plan. The Guidelines are also being distributed via ESA’s Chartered Chapters and its members.

“Schools are a reflection of the local community and their security needs are handled mostly on a local level,” said ESA Executive Director and CEO Merlin Guilbeau. “ESA is the perfect organization to address this subject and we are pleased to provide this new resource to the education community. With members in every state that are in touch with local security issues, we stand ready to assist with real world solutions.”

The Guidelines were published on June 18 and presented during a special luncheon at the 2013 Electronic Security Expo (ESX) in Nashville, Tenn. with special guest Michael Kehoe, Newton, Conn. police chief and first responder to the Sandy Hook Elementary tragedy.

“This is a very comprehensive approach to security,” said Chief Kehoe. “Each school is unique: different locations, ages of kids, physical layout, and so on. This approach lets the assessment be individualized. I definitely support it.”

Individuals interested in learning more about school security planning are invited to download the ESA Electronic Security Guidelines for Schools. For more information, contact ESA at SchoolSecurity@ESAweb.org.

Established in 1948, the Electronic Security Association (ESA) is the largest trade association representing the electronic life safety and security industry. Member companies install, integrate and monitor intrusion and fire detection, video surveillance and electronic access control systems for commercial, residential, industrial and governmental clients. In cooperation with an alliance of chapter associations, ESA provides technical and management training, government advocacy and delivers information, advice, tools, and services that members use to grow their businesses and prosper. ESA may be reached at (888) 447-1689 or on the Web at www.ESAweb.org.

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.